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Movie Review: Tumbbad


via filmfares https://ift.tt/2OqlfwX Debutant director Rahi Anil Barve has given Indian horror a new direction with Tumbbad. It's not a mean feat to make a period horror film. We don't have a history for such films. Therefore it takes great courage, not to mention determination to try out something this unique as your first outing as a director. Tumbbad draws upon our folklore, mythology, as also morality tales to weave together a saga revolving around greed and how like a curse it gets passed from generation to generation and corrupts everyone it touches. The first ten minutes are sure to spook you. A woman more dead than alive, who looks like a zombie, is tied up in a remote house in a remote village in Maharashtra. The period is early 1900s. The woman, who's perpetually sleeping, has to be fed periodically...or else. Feeding her one night when his mother has taken his injured brother to the doctor becomes a rite of passage for a young boy. They leave the place after the brother dies but the youth takes a vow to go hunt for ancestral treasure hidden inside the well and he does so when he grows up. The treasure is guarded by the first born son of the earth goddess and he's not easily seduced to part with it. The young man flirts with death on each journey inside the ancestral well and for years emerges triumphant. Tragedy strikes when later his teenage son becomes too greedy.The cocky youngster wants all the gold gathered at one go, forgetting that he's trying to outwit a mad god...

The atmosphere in the film is dark and sombre. Our protagonist is brave Indeed but somewhere he knows he will have to pay a price for his ill-gotten wealth. He takes to opium and keeps a mistress in order to divert his mind away from his reality and the horrors he revisits on each journey to his ancestral village. True to form, his own young son seduces the father's mistress, thereby showcasing the growth of evil. The horror comes not only from effects and jump cuts but has a psychological edge as well. What gets played out in the end is just the outer manifestation of the inner struggle going back generations.

One of the motifs employed in the film is wheat. Our young hero is all covered in wheat flour when he first learns of the family secret. He uses wheat flour to lure a god, his wife takes to running a flour mill when he goes missing and it's flour which leads to the final deciding chapter. This can be interpreted in terms that it's hunger that makes us do things we won't normally do.

Pune had a unique cultural identity and director Rahi has made us see that with touches like a sign outside a house saying don't ring the bell twice, we aren't deaf. The art direction and production design are world class and the period details are painstakingly recreated. Kudos to cinematographer Pankaj Kumar for the haunting visuals encased in the film.

Sohum Shah, who is also one of the producers of the film, has outdone himself in his gritty portrayal of a man driven by greed. His character is well aware of his frailty but is powerless to overcome it. One of the most impactful scenes in the film is him laughing at and then laughing with his grandmother who has turned into some sort of a monster. It stays with you long after you leave the theatre. Mohammad Samad, who plays his son, is a delight to watch as well. The only hiccup in the film is the dialogue which looks forced in Hindi. It would have been better to make the film in Marathi. All-in-all, Tumbbad, as stated earlier, is a game changer not only for the horror genre but for Hindi cinema overall. Watch the film for its unique concept, spooky visuals and some superb acting.

via filmfares https://ift.tt/2OqlfwX Debutant director Rahi Anil Barve has given Indian horror a new direction with Tumbbad. It's not a mean feat to make a period horror film. We don't have a history for such films. Therefore it takes great courage, not to mention determination to try out something this unique as your first outing as a director. Tumbbad draws upon our folklore, mythology, as also morality tales to weave together a saga revolving around greed and how like a curse it gets passed from generation to generation and corrupts everyone it touches. The first ten minutes are sure to spook you. A woman more dead than alive, who looks like a zombie, is tied up in a remote house in a remote village in Maharashtra. The period is early 1900s. The woman, who's perpetually sleeping, has to be fed periodically...or else. Feeding her one night when his mother has taken his injured brother to the doctor becomes a rite of passage for a young boy. They leave the place after the brother dies but the youth takes a vow to go hunt for ancestral treasure hidden inside the well and he does so when he grows up. The treasure is guarded by the first born son of the earth goddess and he's not easily seduced to part with it. The young man flirts with death on each journey inside the ancestral well and for years emerges triumphant. Tragedy strikes when later his teenage son becomes too greedy.The cocky youngster wants all the gold gathered at one go, forgetting that he's trying to outwit a mad god...

The atmosphere in the film is dark and sombre. Our protagonist is brave Indeed but somewhere he knows he will have to pay a price for his ill-gotten wealth. He takes to opium and keeps a mistress in order to divert his mind away from his reality and the horrors he revisits on each journey to his ancestral village. True to form, his own young son seduces the father's mistress, thereby showcasing the growth of evil. The horror comes not only from effects and jump cuts but has a psychological edge as well. What gets played out in the end is just the outer manifestation of the inner struggle going back generations.

One of the motifs employed in the film is wheat. Our young hero is all covered in wheat flour when he first learns of the family secret. He uses wheat flour to lure a god, his wife takes to running a flour mill when he goes missing and it's flour which leads to the final deciding chapter. This can be interpreted in terms that it's hunger that makes us do things we won't normally do.

Pune had a unique cultural identity and director Rahi has made us see that with touches like a sign outside a house saying don't ring the bell twice, we aren't deaf. The art direction and production design are world class and the period details are painstakingly recreated. Kudos to cinematographer Pankaj Kumar for the haunting visuals encased in the film.

Sohum Shah, who is also one of the producers of the film, has outdone himself in his gritty portrayal of a man driven by greed. His character is well aware of his frailty but is powerless to overcome it. One of the most impactful scenes in the film is him laughing at and then laughing with his grandmother who has turned into some sort of a monster. It stays with you long after you leave the theatre. Mohammad Samad, who plays his son, is a delight to watch as well. The only hiccup in the film is the dialogue which looks forced in Hindi. It would have been better to make the film in Marathi. All-in-all, Tumbbad, as stated earlier, is a game changer not only for the horror genre but for Hindi cinema overall. Watch the film for its unique concept, spooky visuals and some superb acting.

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