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Editor Jitesh Pillaai talks about veeres Kareena Kapoor Khan and Sonam Kapoor


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Band of sisters

The promos of Veere Di Wedding are making quite a buzz. The film shows a quartet of gal pals laughing, joking, cussing like real women. We’ve had lad movies like Dil Chahta Hai (2001) or 3 Idiots (2009) to name two obvious examples, where men swear eternal friendship to each while finding their feet in life. Wherever there are two leading men involved, it’s been about male bonding. Be it Sholay, whose Jai-Veeru are the gold standard of male friendship or Sangam in the ’60s, to this year’s Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety... each one of these films has sung hosannas about male friendship.

Letter from the editor

But it’s not to say female bonding is absent from our films. I remember watching Mandi (1984). The camaraderie that the women shared in the film was almost palpable. This Shyam Benegal film had powerful performers as Smita Patil, Shabana Azmi, Neena Gupta and Soni Razdan and appears as fresh today as it did years ago. In Rajkumar Santoshi’s Lajja (2001), women looked out for each other and struck a blow against patriarchy. The film emphasised that men couldn’t be trusted to accept women as they are and women have only themselves to turn to. It was a commercial film but packed in a powerful message.

Letter from the editor

Chak De! India (2007) of course, centred around a girl’s hockey team. It portrayed rivalries, compassion and friendship in equal measure and showed that if women learn to set aside their differences and play to their strengths, they could beat the world. Films such as Dor (2006), where two strangers meet and bond over a shared destiny or Queen (2013), where Kangana Ranaut’s character learns much from the free-spirited Lisa Haydon’s character further reinforced the idea that all women are sisters in spirit and should do well to recognise that.

Currently, the real world is witnessing long-term changes like the #Metoo movement, which is enabling more and more women to speak out against different forms of harassment faced by them. One thing that’s been taught to girls since eons is to be ‘ladylike’ in behaviour. They are expected to repress their laughter, their tears, their anger and their sexuality and wear a veil of decorum all the time. Such stereotypes are encouraged through our films as well. That’s why films like Veere Di Wedding are important where the women unapologetically have fun and make their own choices without succumbing to norms. Let’s hope it’s not just a flash in the pan and that inspired by it, more and more filmmakers come forward with women-centric stories...

via filmfares https://ift.tt/2JyVnbF
Band of sisters

The promos of Veere Di Wedding are making quite a buzz. The film shows a quartet of gal pals laughing, joking, cussing like real women. We’ve had lad movies like Dil Chahta Hai (2001) or 3 Idiots (2009) to name two obvious examples, where men swear eternal friendship to each while finding their feet in life. Wherever there are two leading men involved, it’s been about male bonding. Be it Sholay, whose Jai-Veeru are the gold standard of male friendship or Sangam in the ’60s, to this year’s Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety... each one of these films has sung hosannas about male friendship.

Letter from the editor

But it’s not to say female bonding is absent from our films. I remember watching Mandi (1984). The camaraderie that the women shared in the film was almost palpable. This Shyam Benegal film had powerful performers as Smita Patil, Shabana Azmi, Neena Gupta and Soni Razdan and appears as fresh today as it did years ago. In Rajkumar Santoshi’s Lajja (2001), women looked out for each other and struck a blow against patriarchy. The film emphasised that men couldn’t be trusted to accept women as they are and women have only themselves to turn to. It was a commercial film but packed in a powerful message.

Letter from the editor

Chak De! India (2007) of course, centred around a girl’s hockey team. It portrayed rivalries, compassion and friendship in equal measure and showed that if women learn to set aside their differences and play to their strengths, they could beat the world. Films such as Dor (2006), where two strangers meet and bond over a shared destiny or Queen (2013), where Kangana Ranaut’s character learns much from the free-spirited Lisa Haydon’s character further reinforced the idea that all women are sisters in spirit and should do well to recognise that.

Currently, the real world is witnessing long-term changes like the #Metoo movement, which is enabling more and more women to speak out against different forms of harassment faced by them. One thing that’s been taught to girls since eons is to be ‘ladylike’ in behaviour. They are expected to repress their laughter, their tears, their anger and their sexuality and wear a veil of decorum all the time. Such stereotypes are encouraged through our films as well. That’s why films like Veere Di Wedding are important where the women unapologetically have fun and make their own choices without succumbing to norms. Let’s hope it’s not just a flash in the pan and that inspired by it, more and more filmmakers come forward with women-centric stories...

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